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motorcycles

Robison Motorcycles in Daytona Beach, Florida is an institution. In our film, Why We Ride, Robison’s was the location for on-camera interviews with Buzz Kanter, Jay Allen, and Gloria Struck. In honor of Daytona Bike Week, we take a peek at the Daytona Beach institution.

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Still from the film Why We Ride

Joe Robison opened up Robison Harley Davidson in 1962. The first location was on Balou Road where he stayed for about a year, before moving to its present location 508 W. Volusia Ave, now known as International Speedway Boulevard. The shop is filled with rich Harley Davidson history, including some of the very first Harley and Davidson family photos, early dealer conventions, racing on the beach and more. Joe Robison was the original and only local Harley dealer in Daytona from 1962 to 1993, when he sold the dealership and changed his business to Robisons Motorcycles Sales and Service.

Robison Motorcycles | Daytona Beach Florida

Today Robison’s is still in business, specializing in motorcycles over 10 years old. It is one of the oldest motorcycle shops in Daytona Beach and has a large inventory of Harley Davidson Vintage parts.

Jordan Robison
Photo: Jordan Simmons (4th Generation) puts in some late night hours working on a bike.

Jecoa, Old Man Joe Robison’s grandson, now runs the shop. But we buying http://hotcanadianpharmacy.com/drugs/Xanax/ online buying http://hotcanadianpharmacy.com/drugs/Xanax/ online hear that Old Man Robison still leaves a box of tools out front every night for any lone biker who might need to work on his bike.

Willie G Davidson | Harley-Davidson

If you are in Daytona, do stop by Robison’s Motorcycles for motorcycle maintenance and repair, or step back in time and check out the vintage racing bikes, and listen to Daytona racing stories from Old Man Robison himself.

**Photos from Robisons Motorcycles Facebook page.**

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Pop Quiz: What do Tony Hawk, Perry Farrell of Jane’s Addiction, and Why We Ride star land speed racer Karlee Cobb have in common? They were all at Tony Hawk and Friends’ Annual Stand Up for Skateparks Benefit in Beverly Hills last month! Karlee Cobb, 21, daughter of land-speed record holder, Laura Klock, launched her first motorcycle design.

Brian Klock shows Perry Farrell what they customized on the Triumph.  T100. Karlee Cobb looks on. Photo source: StandUpForSkateParks.org Brian Klock shows Perry Farrell what they customized on the Triumph. T100. Karlee Cobb looks on. Photo source: StandUpForSkateParks.org

Karlee’s design was based off a 2014 Bonneville T100 donated by Triumph Motorcycles, with modified and custom made parts by Klock Werks, along with carefully chosen parts from Triumph, British Customs, Joker Machine, Metzeler Tires, Nash Motorcycle Company and Hagon Shocks. The custom paint job was done by Brad Smith of The Factory Match. Perry Farrell of Jane’s Addiction and Lollapalooza fame, and his wife Etty, had the winning bid for the 2014 Triumph T100 desert runner designed by Karlee. “It has a bag for skateboards!” Karlee shared.

Karlee Cobb 's first design effort - Triumph T100 for the benefit of Tony Hawk's Foundation.Karlee Cobb ‘s first design effort – Triumph T100 for the benefit of Tony Hawk’s Foundation.

This year’s Stand Up For Skateparks raised over $850,000. Proceeds support the Tony Hawk Foundation’s mission to empower youth through the creation of free, quality, public skateparks in low-income communities throughout the U.S., and Internationally with programs that enrich the lives of youth through skateboarding. (*source: standupforskateparks.org)

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Ed Kretz | Indian Motorcycle | Why We Ride

Legendary motorcycle racer Ed “Iron Man” Kretz, Sr. is one of the main inspirations behind our film, Why We Ride. He was a motorcycle racer in the 1930s and 1940s, best known for winning the first Daytona 200 race in 1937, riding an Indian Sport Scout. His other victories included the Savannah 200-mile road race, the Langhorne 100 Mile and the Laconia Classic.

We had the privilege of interviewing Ed’s children in our movie, and the entire Kretz family was extremely helpful throughout the production process. Ed Kretz, Jr. was a renowned racer himself, winning many races both on and off road and was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 2002. He and his sister Donna Forstall provided invaluable insight into the life of Ed Kretz, Sr. and what it was like to grow up with a motorcycle racing pioneer.

We were deeply saddened to lose Ed Kretz, Jr. last fall, so we were happy to see the family organize a memorial ride in his honor. The first annual Kretz Memorial Ride will take place on September 6, 2014 in Colorado, and all proceeds from the ride will go to the Alzheimer’s Association. Ed Kretz Jr.’s wife Elaine was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease in March of 2006, so the Kretz Memorial Ride is a way to honor both Ed and Elaine while raising money to find a cure. Please join us for a day of riding, remembering and fundraising!

>>Follow the Kretz Memorial Ride page on Facebook

>>RSVP and get more event info on the Facebook event

The event will kick off with registration and breakfast at 8:00 am in Sedalia, CO, at O’Brien’s Cafe. It will conclude with a BBQ lunch at Fay Myers. The cost for the ride is $25 per person and includes a t-shirt, breakfast and lunch fees. Additional donations may also be sent to the Kretz Memorial Fund on the Alzheimer’s Association page here.

Ed Kretz Sr.
From Facebook.com/kretzmemorialride | Ed Kretz Jr. signs autographs. 

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You’ve heard of biker babes, of course, but what about biker babies? Let’s face it, there are few things in life as adorable as a baby on a motorcycle. Why We Ride features a lot of families, and these photos from our fans prove that you’re never too young to throw a leg over a motorcycle.

Let’s get started with this perfect, welcoming shot by Ian Somers:

IanSomers_BabyBoy

You know your kids are growing up when they’re big enough to reach the handlebars, as seen in this photo by Linda Cluxton:

LindaCluxton_LittleGirl

The same goes for Stewart Saunders’s grandson Ethan:

StewartSaunders_GrandsonEthan

Graeme Plenderleith keeps baby Sebastian steady:

GraemePlenderleith_BabySebastian

And Sean Hyvonen gives his baby boy a ride during a track day:

SeanHyvonen_BabyBoy

James Poff’s grandson Jase practices riding a Harley…

JamesPoff_GrandsonJase

…While Kevin Miles proves that his son prefers sportbikes:

KevinMiles_BabyBoy

And we bid farewell to this week’s roundup, with a wave from Landon in this pic from Scott Mikesell:

ScottMikesell_Landon

 

 

 

NOTE: Featured Image above is baby Rowdy by Kasey Gavin Pederson-Sylvester

Why We Ride fans have some serious riding skills, whether it’s on one wheel or two. We thought we’d celebrate another #wheeliewednesday by sharing some more of your wheelie photos.

This roundup proves that you really can wheelie anything, even scooters, as Michael Moore shows us:

MichaelMoore_Scooter

Cruisers are more than capable, too. Check out Rich Halverson’s launch:

RichHalverson

Parke Weaver cruises on one wheel:

ParkeWeaver

Ron Dyball’s picture covers the mini wheelie category:

RonDyball

Angel Lasheras and Michael Wallis demonstrate how to balance a dirt bike on one wheel:

AngelLasheras

MichaelWallis

When it comes to sportbikes, Paul Drewe and John Van Der Klugt have it covered:

PaulDrewe

JohnVanDerKlugt

We also liked this shot from Zack Balthazor:

ZackBalthazor

And this one from Kaue Ramos, in front of London’s iconic Ace Cafe:

KaueRamos_AceCafe

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If you’ve seen posts on Facebook tagged #wheeliewednesday, then you know there are some great pictures out there of riders showing off their balancing skills. We’re proud to say that some of the coolest photos come from Why We Ride fans. Check out these wheelies, then head over to the Why We Ride Facebook page and post your own wheelie picture.

First, a wheelie primer from Erin Tanfield, who shows us how it’s done on this classic Honda CBR600:

ErinTanfield

We think Aaron Conners would agree that “peace, love and wheelies” is the best caption for this picture:

AaronConners

The vintage vibe is also in this great shot of Dan Hirst, showing off his stunting skills in 1974:

DanHirst_1974

Here’s another one from Ryan Deckard:

RyanDeckard

And Matthew Price:
Matthew Price

And last but certainly not the least, this wheelie shot from Torbjörn Orell:
Torbjörn Orell

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Ryan Gosling | First Bike

Recently, we asked a question on our Facebook page: how did you save up for your first motorcycle? Your answers – and your photos – made us nostalgic for our own early days of saving our pennies and dreaming of our first motorcycle. Timothy Crump set aside money he made working at a grocery store after school, and this picture of him from 1969 is classic. TimothyCrump Many of you knew you wanted a motorcycle when you were still young, so you took on any and all odd jobs to buy some two-wheeled freedom. David Lowe cut grass around his neighborhood. Curtis Botzet, as a 12 year old, baled hay and fed cows on a neighbor’s farm for the $250 he needed to get a Yamaha XT250. “Paper route” was one of the most common answers, too. Dan Bader used the money from his paper route to get a Honda ST 90. DanBader At only 14 years old, James Sullivan worked a summer job to save up the $100 it cost for a 1965 Honda with a 65cc motor. Now 60, James is still riding, though we suspect he’s gone up in engine size since that first ride. Lawrence Jojola got a job at Uncle Cliff’s Amusement Park in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He used the money to buy a 1972 Honda 100, then turned it into his commuter ride. LawrenceJojola Seventeen-year-old John Koboroff was clearly excited when he finally had enough money to buy a Yamaha YDS3 250 in 1970. JohnKoboroff How did you save up for your first motorcycle? Leave a comment below and let us know!

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If you are heading out to the Sturgis Rally this year, be sure to check out Buffalo Chip’s 2014 Motorcycles as Art Exhibition, now on its 14th year. Renowned motorcycle photographer Michael Lichter is once again curating the show dubbed “Built for Speed – Race Inspired Motorcycles and Art.” For the second year in a row, the art exhibit will be co-curated by Paul d’Orleans of the Vintagent. Both Michael and Paul are featured in our movie, Why We Ride. The impressive display of motorcycles and related art will run from Saturday, August 2nd through Friday, August 9th.

builtforspeed1_Spirit_of_Munro

builtforspeed2_Warren_Lane

A total of 35 custom motorcycles will be featured in “Built for Speed.” Each custom bike in the exhibition reflects a different branch of racing: Speedway, Flat Track, Drag Racing, Board Track, Grand Prix and Land Speed Record. Race-themed painting, photography and prints by artists equally inspired by competition motorcycles will adorn the walls surrounding these amazing machines, in addition to an all new “21 Helmets” display from SeeSee Motor-Coffee in Portland.

Builders sending bikes include:

Alan Stulberg
Arlen Ness
Atomic Trent Schara
Bill Dodge
Bill Rodencal
Brad Richards
Brandon Holstein
Brian Klock
Dan “Bacon” Carr
Dan Rognsvoog
Danny Schneider (Switzerland)
Jason Paul Michaels
John Reed
Kenji “Ken” Nagai (Japan)
Kevin Baas
Kirk Taylor
Matt Olsen
Nate Jacobs
Pat Patterson
Paul Cox
Paul Wideman
Roland Sands
Skeeter Todd
Tator Gilmore
Warren Lane
Zach Ness

Paul Cox | Built for Speed | Sturgis

Arlen Ness | Built for Speed Art Exhibit | Sturgis

Factory-built machines include:

Harley-Davidson’s Custom Street 750
Indian’s “Spirit of Munro” Streamliner
Confederate Motorcycles’ Land Speed Racer
Icon’s “Iron Lung” Road Racer
George Smith’s “Tramp” (replica) from S&S
Deus Ex Machina Buell Bully
Clem Johnson’s original Vincent “Barn Job” from John Stein

Artists on the walls include:

Marc Lacourciere
Darren McKeag
David Uhl
Eric Hermann
Jeff Nobles
Michael Lichter
Paul d’Orleans
Richie Pan
Scott Jacobs
Scott Takes
Tom Fritz
Trish Horstman

The exhibit is free and open to the public. To find the Michael Lichter Art Gallery at the Buffalo Chip, head to the Buffalo Chip and turn east on Alkali Road, go to the east entrance. The gallery is next to the east entrance and does not require a ticket to enter.

For more information, visit buffalochip.com/events

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There are few greater feelings than an open road on a beautiful summer day. Being able to leave your cares behind and enjoy life on two wheels is the definition of pure bliss. When the smell of fresh cut grass or a cool ocean breeze gently lofts into your nostrils, you can see why riders always say they will be on a motorcycle for the rest of their life. Riding a motorcycle this time of year changes a person, you notice that your perspective of the world around you changes for the better. Think about all those warm summer vibes you have had on your motorcycle, and feel free to share below some of those great times.

“There is always that one summer that changes you.”

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Red, White and Blue Ridge

The Fourth of July is upon us, which means our American fans will be cooking out, watching fireworks shows and celebrating Independence Day.

To celebrate the day of red, white and blue, we thought we would share some of your photos from the Blue Ridge Mountains. The Tail of the Dragon is, of course, an iconic stretch of road. With 318 curves in 11 miles, conquering it is a rite of passage for many a motorcycle rider. But there are plenty of other spectacular rides through the mountains, like the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Cherohala Skyway.

We’ll get started with a virtual tour of The Tail of the Dragon. First up is this scenic picture from Achim Franz.

AchimFranz_TheDragon

Kenneth James shows us that lean angle helps if you’re trying to slay the Dragon.

KennethJames_Dragon

And that twisty challenge isn’t just for sportbike riders and lightweight bikes. Plenty of big bikes are capable to taking on those curves, as Sohail Rezeq proves.

SohailRezeq_Dragon

Cyn Tee shared this lovely view from Skyline Drive in Virginia, which winds through Shenandoah National Park.

CynTee_SkylineDrVirginia

Twelve miles, 160 curves and a 2,000-foot elevation drop are some of the things that make Devil’s Whip in North Carolina a popular riding spot. Jeremy Gilliland cranks his bike over along that section of NC State Road 80.

JeremyGilliland_NC80DevilsWhip

Paula Yetman proves that a beautiful Blue Ridge road doesn’t have to have a fancy name. There are plenty of roads in North Carolina that offer pristine views and lots of curves.

PaulaYetman_NCRoads

The Cherohala Skyway has been designated a National Scenic Byway. If you’ve ever ridden its 40-plus miles, you understand why. If you haven’t been there yet, Esteban Rottenberg can tell you what an amazing ride it is.

EstebanRottenberg_Cherohola

Karen Bataille shows us why the Blue Ridge Parkway continues to be a favorite ride on the East Coast.

KarenBataille_BlueRidgePkwy

At 5,946 feet in height, Grandfather Mountain is the tallest peak on the eastern side of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Kathy Harrison captured this view overlooking the land for miles around.

KathyHarrison_GrandfatherMtnSmokies